Mad Max, Fury Road

Mad Max: Fury Road kills the Oscars

While the Oscars predilection for genre films, let alone science fiction, has been non-existent, last night George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road performed exceptionally well. One of two sci-fi film nominees for Best Picture, Fury Road (alongside The Martian) joins only a handful of films of this genre to have been recognized by the Academy. The film didn’t win the arguably deserved Best Picture despite a worldwide box office of over $370 million, but it did take home awards for Sound Mixing, Sound Editing, Film Editing, Production Design, Makeup, and Costume Design – more awards than any other film nominated this year.

But why was its nomination for Best Picture so important? Take a look at the cast and the so-called controversy surrounding the film. As soon as the film was described as a feminist, the backlash began. Max doesn’t speak much during the film, but that makes his presence and actions even more pronounced, and Tom Hardy‘s performance was outstanding. The women featured prominently in the film include an amputee as well as actresses from different nationalities/racial backgrounds and various ages. Charlize Theron commands respect brings the importance of the overall plot to the audience through her character, Imperator Furiosa. The women at the center of the film (portrayed by Zoë KravitzRosie Huntington-WhiteleyRiley KeoughAbbey Lee, and Courtney Eatonare sex slaves escaping the Citadel and the nightmare of Immortan Joe (Mad Max alum Hugh Keays-Byrne). The War Boys that work alongside Furiosa trust her in a way that regards her position with a tremendous trust prior to her betrayal that isn’t overtly obvious to the audience – and that’s the point.

In the end, the arguments of why the film isn’t feminist are unsurprisingly reasons why the film is feminist. The chastity belts the women have locked around them are toothed, threatening to put any potential rapist in peril – but these were placed by a man who wanted to save the raping privileges for himself. The women are owned, kept captive, raped, and called “breeders”, and this denotation is purposeful in the storytelling as the mantra of the movie is We Are Not Things. The weak arguments of a feminist story being shoved down the throats of the Mad Max franchise’s fans doesn’t hold up, and the efforts Miller made in creating a story that was compelling and included female narratives was deserving of the Best Picture nomination – not because there were women, but because it was a great film. The movies, while centered around Max, have always been about the people he interacts with more so than him specifically, and the continuity of specific moments over the course of the films such as Max trying to retrieve his belongings (jacket, boot, his iconic V8 Interceptor) and the fallible shotgun shells and weapons jams were perfection. The War Boys and their worshiping the V8 was a great addition, and Nicholas Hoult‘s Nux was an interesting and wonderful character for the Mad Max universe. The story, visuals, editing, choreography, special and physical effects, and the sound were all outstanding, and the Academy served the film well with the nominations and awards it received. If only it could have received the award it deserved – Best Picture.

Can I buy the Deadpool team a round?

There have been a few comic characters that have consistently stood out to me as being hands down perfectly imperfect and absolutely awesome. While my love for other characters may seem to waver in intensity (and I always have a writer or two I’ll favor over others when it comes to characterization), my love for Deadpool has been steadfast since I picked up the comic a couple years ago – but my adoration for Wade Wilson is nothing compared to that of Ryan Reynolds’.

The beauty of the Deadpool movie is the passion that went into making it. The utter relentlessness and tenacity it took to get this thing made is fucking inspirational. Reynolds took the phrase “if you want something done right, do it yourself” and ran with it, while writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick (give these guys a raise) took an amalgamation of characteristics from various Deadpool writers’ take on Wilson over the past twenty-five years to create this awesome cinematic version that is true to the comics. Tim Miller’s vision for the movie and insistence on Deadpool being pansexual made me want to pull a Macho Man Randy Savage Oooooh yeah! and punch a straight white boy whining about Deadpool’s non-existent heterosexuality in the face. I was already sold at the leaked footage, but with the genius marketing team (and Reynolds himself) pushing Fox Studios to the point that those who weren’t completely sold on the profitability of the NSFW style of super hero were probably suffering from stomach ulcers and anxiety, I knew walking in that I was not going to be disappointed – and that’s an amazing feat when it comes to Fox Studio superhero films. The X-Men franchise is one that I always have high hopes for and am slightly disappointed with if not entirely upset that I didn’t spend the time writing crack fiction instead. This time, Fox got it right – thanks to a creative team fighting the studio for Wade the entire way. Honestly, they should be thanking the pains in the ass that kept fighting for this movie to be made for all the heartache.

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Deadpool, Fox Studios 2016

The movie that resulted was a visually pleasing, crass, in-character, fourth wall-breaking ride that had the entire theater laughing. I’ve never been in a theater with so many pleased audience members – except maybe the morons that let their children sweet talk them into taking them to see the R-rated “super hero” flick – which was R-rated for a hundred different reasons, as it should have been; if Deadpool hadn’t been R-rated, it would have been untrue to the character and a disappointment with fans. Thankfully, it wasn’t PG-13’d down. It was oddly refreshing and appropriate to hear “Fuck fuck fucking shitfuck!” coming from the speakers. As for the cinematic elements, even though there were amazingly violent visuals that were on par with the comics, we weren’t overwhelmed with special effects. Other than Colossus and the instances of Angel Dust’s landing and Negasonic Teenage Warhead using her powers, the only obvious special effects sequence is also one that had a lot of physical effects – the road and bridge scene we saw in the leaked footage and the trailers. 

Ultimately, this movie came down to the characters and the story. When it comes to character background, I’ve always leaned toward Marvel because of how much I’m invested in their personal narrative. Whether it’s Avengers or S.H.I.E.L.D. agents or Agent Peggy Carter – these characters have stories that are begging to be told and the audience wants to hear, which is obvious with the film and television franchises. Deadpool’s success is notable not only because of the R-rated content, ingenuity of marketing, and unique storytelling that matched wits with the source content, but because of the characters. Had the characters been watered down in either humor or tragedy, this movie wouldn’t have been a success, let alone a record breaking one. In an interview with Forbes magazine, Rhett Reese said that the success of the movie showed “how much people really love character above special effects”, and this is especially true with comic book fans. We love the explosions and fights, but fuck if we don’t love the characters above all else, which the Deadpool team brought in force. Being accurate when it comes to a character and providing an interesting story doesn’t have to involve $100 million in special effects, dramatically and inaccurately killing off a character for shock effect, or laser eyes. Critics are saying this is a game-changer in the super hero movie genre, and I sincerely hope it is. The family-friendly movies are great, but when the opportunity is there to create a movie for adults, why not take it? Sure, there’s not a lot of marketing opportunity for the toy aisle at Target, but I’m sure the adult market will make up for it. Maybe this will finally be the dick waving in the face of the studios that makes them realize it.

Moving away from the “strong female” trope and just writing good characters

Over the course of television and film history we’ve watched as generations of women lobbied for female representation. Lynda Carter’s Wonder Woman in the 70s has been iconic, as well as the ladies that made up Charlie’s Angels leading into the 80s and Lucy Lawless’ Xena in the 90s. The badass women who were beautiful and beat the hell out of the bad guys were important to lots of girls growing up, but The Powers That Be take these characters as a base for building not so great characters with traits that became a tiring trope – a disservice to the audience, let alone the women behind these characters.  While female characters who dress scantily, are excellent marksmen, and punch assholes in the face are awesome, when the characterization stops there the importance of creating a female role in the first place is lost.

Important steps forward have been seen in characters like Buffy Summers who was feminine, wore makeup, and loved pink while also being exceptionally skilled, allowing girls to see that just because you like things that are typically associated with girls doesn’t make you weak – and that you don’t have to discard femininity or look down on girls who drew hearts in pink glitter pen on their notebooks to be powerful.

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Danai Gurira as Michonne [from TWD Wikia]

The Walking Dead‘s Michonne has been a touching example of a fascinating female character as we watch her slice through zombies and enemies alike with a cold and quiet demeanor, only to be shown how vulnerable and nurturing she really was. Her strength was displayed in putting down her weapon when she had the opportunity to and picking it back up again when she was needed. Meanwhile, Bella Crawford on Bryan Fuller’s Hannibal was stubborn and desired to die with dignity and Orphan Black‘s clones display a mixture of science mastery, ability for manipulation, and suburban motherhood among their strengths. Creating female characters with depth that didn’t bust in people’s faces on the regular was also important, redefining “strong women” and broadening the characters we were seeing on screen, both big and small. Showing emotions doesn’t always make you weak, wielding a weapon doesn’t always make you strong, and giving a diverse display of what it means to be a woman reaches and resonates with a broader audience.

We’re seeing a beautiful change in female representation in media overall, but within the shows themselves that are providing this representation, it’s better than expected. While the film industry is still trying to catch up, television (network, cable, and instant streaming) is sprinting away with characters that are dynamic and fully fleshed out with strengths and faults in all shapes, sizes, ages, ethnic groups, and sexualities in shows like The 100, The Walking Dead, Agent Carter, How To Get Away With Murder, Jessica Jones, Daredevil, Vikings, and so many more. More than that, we’re getting relationships between women and platonic relationships between women and menI have to pause for a moment in disbelief and joy because those two things make me so incredibly happy. Women are not only being written with characteristics like fierce loyalty, cleverness, ruthlessness, and nurturing love, but we’re also being shown why the pretentions of previous decades are absolutely ridiculous. Recently in an episode of Agent Carter, already noted for doing at excellent job in representation (especially for the time period in which it is set), the male characters scoff at the idea of a larger woman – despite being a trained member of the agency – being able to take on an integral part of a mission that required her to be physical.

Lesley Boone, Rose Roberts, Agent Carter

Lesley Boone as Rose Roberts in Season 2 of Agent Carter

This attitude is similar to what the men did to Peggy Carter herself, and while no longer doubting Peggy’s prowess, Sousa doubted this woman’s ability to do her job while scapegoating it on him being able to focus and not be worried about her. Of course she accomplishes her task with a satisfied grin. Reinforcing the same point that Agent Carter made in its first season, this moment added appearances into the mix, giving bigger women such as myself (who had to experience disheartening looks of shock when I told people I did 5ks for fun and was training for a half-marathon) representation and a boost of confidence.

The true heart of these shows is character, and it seems as if creators are realizing just how important these things are to their audiences. Some are understanding better than others by giving us a wide range of female characters that are representative of not just their audience, but the world we live in. What we’re seeing more and more of is a move away from creators struggling to write a “strong female character” in an original way that avoids the cookie cutter trope and just creating female characters – and writing good story lines for them. What an intriguing concept.

The Audience Payout: Growing and nurturing an enthusiastic fan base loses out to over-monetizing network television

Sometimes networks can be shortsighted in considering their audiences when they’re trying to look at the bigger picture. Business decisions are currently being made that don’t take into account the fan bases that drive the success of their shows – at least not from the fan perspective. Media companies are in the business of making money, and with the popularity of streaming sites like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime continuing to rise while original content on those sites are gaining traction, this might nudge a network into considering its own streaming as a for-pay service while pulling their shows from the popular sites to cash in on the market. The problem is, it’s not a question of when – it’s already happening.

BBC has already pulled shows from Netflix, and the CW is looking to follow suit. Normally the comings and goings of shows available on Netflix streaming don’t cause a fuss, but these two networks provide some pretty popular shows. Doctor Who has been removed from Netflix, which I’m afraid to tell my kids since they recently talked about going back and watching some of the tenth doctor’s episodes. A heavily present network on Netflix, the CW has shows with large fanbases: The Vampire Diaries, iZombie, The 100, The Originals, The Flash, Arrow, and Supernatural.

If you look at the fans that are most active on social media, promoting the shows they love through these outlets and in other ways such as buying merchandise, the fans of the CW especially are known for urging family and friends to watch the shows either as their weekly ritual or as guilty pleasures. These fans attend conventions frequently, an experience which I wrote about earlier this year. The shows are important to them, and across Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, and Tumblr, the shows are discussed in detail and even academically.

With Netflix, getting new people to watch these shows was easy, especially ones like Doctor Who and Supernatural that have been on for over a decade. Having heard a little about them or being pressured by a friend to give a show a try, someone could click Season 1, Episode 1 and be on their way. An entire audience that returns to the shows again and again to rewatch either alone or with friends they’re bringing in as new viewers should be enough to realize how important presence on a popular streaming site is; add to that the potential for growing an audience that wasn’t old enough to get into the show when it first aired, but has since taken an interest in it, and it makes sense to keep this platform available. Being able to stream from the beginning to catch up to the new shows is how many have moved to watching the shows live, helping ratings of shows that may have fallen by the wayside years ago.

Again taking the fans into consideration, the active audience demographics for these shows are on the younger side, and if they or their parents are already paying for cable, internet, and Netflix, does the network think that they will pay long term for an additional streaming service? I’ve left behind shows that I had to pay by the episode for or gone to torrent if I really wanted to watch them. Promising people that something won’t be available for Netflix streaming may boost sales of DVDs temporarily, but DVDs are no longer the viewing platform of choice. NBC, ABC, and CBS following suit would completely complicate the viewing experience with too many subscription services and drastically reduce the amount of households that purchase cable subscriptions, something they already know as CBS is inviting you to try an All Access on demand pass – your first week is free. Asking viewers to buy access to shows through a new site when they’ve been paying to access television and movies for years through a cable company or a site they’re comfortable with is taking a gamble on a sector of the audience that will question just how much they want to watch these shows – you can only act like a crack dealer with television for so long before the audience moves on or finds other ways to access the shows. Plus, there are always other shows available to get hooked on and that can provide meta writers fodder – you’re not the only drug on the street.

Attention spans for media can be short and viewers can be fickle, and if the accessibility to shows become too costly or complicated, the audience will walk – maybe not everyone, but enough to make a network like the CW take pause. Obviously a way to make money for the network instead of connect to the fans that support their shows, this venture is sure to alienate the audience more than connect with them. The number of shows I’m interested in watching has lessened the more restricted the access to them gets. If it’s a pain in the ass to watch, I’ll just write, draw, or read a book and watch something on my DVR. I was a more enthusiastic fan because the shows were available on a streaming platform that I was already using, and with Doctor Who gone and the threat of the CW leaving, I can already feel my interest in watching the shows waning. Who wants to try to get into Arrow if they don’t have time to catch up before past episodes of the show vanish? In the meantime, I’ll be over here waiting for the next seasons of Daredevil and Jessica Jones.

DC’s Dawn of the Justice League: Wonder Woman and Suicide Squad

On the CW earlier this week, the network presented a special hosted by Kevin Smith and Geoff Johns. DC Comics: Dawn of the Justice League gave us sneak peeks at the 2017 movie Wonder Woman featuring Gal Gadot and the first trailer for Suicide Squad that we’ve seen since the sneak peek at SDCC 2015.

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Johns and Smith discussing Wonder Woman on the CW’s DC Comics: Dawn of the Justice League

The Wonder Woman exclusive showed the heroine moving through the ages and basically being a badass. Gal Gadot brings Wonder Woman to life fantastically, and I can’t wait to see the full length feature. Gratefully, Smith and Johns seem excited as I am about Diana Prince coming to the big screen, and described her as a “feminist icon”.  I can’t argue.

biased

I may be a bit biased when it comes to Wonder Woman.

What Marvel missed in the film department, DC picked up on – women and young girls are so there for leading ladies, and I think we’ll be seeing a shift in representation. Recently in regards to Star Wars, it was pointed out that Disney didn’t push Rey merchandise – or have any. They said they didn’t want to give away spoilers, but many fans were left asking, “Bitch, where?” GQ (the magazine using sexy women asking for your email to get you to sign up for their mailing list) pointed out that looking at The Avengers merchandise from 2012, Black Widow was inexplicably absent from shelves with no spoilers linked to the character. The excuse is weak. My youngest son, who was five years old when Avengers came out, asked the same thing, and again with better diction and genuine concern when Age of Ultron was released. Kids pay attention. Hopefully we’ll get a metric ton of Wonder Woman gear for both men and women – and don’t be going pink on me, DC.

The Suicide Squad trailer seduced us with a little “Bohemian Rhapsody” and had a great look, but I’m hesitant to throw all my excitement into this because of the over-hype regarding Jared Leto’s Joker. Personally, as I’m sure everyone does, I have characters I fall in love with written in one way and when seeing them written/portrayed in another way I squint until I’m sure I can let go and enjoy the incarnation I’m seeing. Part of me is worried that Leto’s portrayal will be a brightly colored Kylo Ren – a character believing they’re a badass and completely intimidating, but in actuality is a whiny brat that everyone just wants to avoid any interaction with, and not just because they might be killed. But, I trust David Ayer and John Ostrander to bring a good story, and that’s where the root of the film lies. Besides my character bias, I’m generally a watch and see kind of person – I’ll wade through the negative reviews and give something a chance to see for myself if the criticisms have merit and then make my opinion. So far from what I’ve seen of Suicide Squad, I’m here for Harley Quinn and Deadshot. Margot Robbie (Harley Quinn) and Will Smith (Deadshot) stood out in the initial SDCC first look and the trailer shown during the CW special, and Viola Davis as Amanda Waller seems to mirror her outstanding performance as Analise Keating on How to Get Away With Murder. Those three actors alone have me interested in seeing what this movie brings – Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje as Killer Croc, Jay Hernandez as El Diablo, Joel Kinnaman as Rick Flagg, and Adam Beach as Slipknot gives me something else to look forward to and I can’t help but do some cheering for a diverse cast. 

I hope that we’ll see more specials like this in the future, and not just from DC. The Marvel look into Captain America was wonderful from a historical perspective and the impact comic book characters and representation have on audiences, and my boys loved watching the Justice League special. Kevin Smith’s never ending enthusiasm for comic books makes him an ideal host for these kinds of shows. More content like this, please.


 

On an adorable note: Kevin Smith cooed over Harley Quinn’s bat at the end of DC Comic’s Justice League special, and later brought the bat home to his daughter – Harley Quinn Smith.

She cried on Instagram, asserting her desire to one day play the role of her namesake saying, “I’m not joking when I say I cried for an hour.”

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Harley Quinn Smith with the Good Night bat Margot Robbie used in her role as Harley Quinn for 2016’s Suicide Squad.

[full story at comicbook.com] If that’s not the cutest damn thing you’ve seen today, at least it’s a great example of how these characters, whether they be heroes or villains, and the opportunity to play them mean so much.

Meanwhile, I’ll be over here patiently waiting for 2017 and the Wonder Woman movie, and not thinking about how tiny Harley Quinn Smith was when she played Mini-Silent Bob in Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, and how I watched that movie in theaters with my friends the beginning of my senior year of high school. I hope all your dreams come true, kiddo. Just stop making me feel old.

 

 

 

Contemplating Convention

When I was seven years old, I attended my first Creation convention. My father coached me repeatedly before we got to the front of the line, ensuring that I said my birthday was in 1985, not 1984, because children six and under were free or at a substantially discounted price. I don’t remember how it went down because when you’re a kid and Klingons are walking around, you don’t pay attention to the ticket table. I walked away with a red Star Trek uniform with captain rank just like my fave, Jean-Luc Picard. I looked awesome.

star trek Ash

See? Awesome.

This was in the early 90s in Chicago, and I didn’t attend another convention until this past year, the first weekend of November 2015 in Denver, Colorado. My father told me I’d be fine despite my anxiety because, after all, I’d been to a convention before. But what he didn’t realize was that there’s a big difference between a child experiencing her favorite fandom with her geeky dad and a thirty-one year old mother of two attending a convention alone with over two hundred strangers. But I was reassured time and time again that with Supernatural fans, we’re more than a fandom – we’re a family.

After my experience at DenverCon, I questioned if I wanted to ever go to a convention again. It wasn’t that I had a negative experience, but having been there, done that, I had more personal impressions to reflect on when thinking about future conventions. Many con-goers are no stranger to Creation events or even plan to go to another convention as soon as their first is over; others are more hesitant. I realized that there are probably hundreds if not thousands of people who wonder if it would be worth it to attend a convention, and in an effort to provide as unbiased a position as possible, here I’m going to unpack the pros and cons of attending a Supernatural convention and explain the convention itself, including pre- and post-con experiences, as well as some of the other aspects of fandom that might be worthy of consideration.

(more…)

Of Motherhood and Geeky Children

I had a strange day today.

I’m not sure what happened, because my day was not supposed to turn out this way. I had a simple goal – go to Target, pick up spinach. My awesome children I affectionately call the Oldest and the Youngest are on their last day of winter break. Remembering they had gift cards from Christmas, they ran upstairs and came back down already plotting what they were going to buy. The Youngest immediately tried to find a Spider Man Infinity figure for Xbox 360 that has been eluding us for months (when we remember to look), and the Oldest who has been saving for the Lego Imperial Star Destroyer came across something that made him forget about it completely. X-Wings are his favorite, and in the display box was Poe’s X-Wing fighter. It was $30 more than what he had on the gift card, but he was willing to give up his Imperial Star Destroyer money for this. Alas, it was out of stock. The Youngest found an Avengers Lego set that he immediately clung to while I tracked down a Target employee to find out if they had any on the way. No dice. But, we were assured a Target six miles down the road had four. Jumping in the car with the Youngest still holding his new Lego set and so excited he now had all the Avenger Lego characters (“Black Widow! Finally!”), I drove through lunch-hour traffic to get to the Target With The Thing.

At the store, the Oldest walked behind me, humming the Star Wars music as we searched for the toy aisle in this unfamiliar Target. We turned the corner and saw the X-Wing display, but again, no set. I found an employee who was very helpful and found that no, they didn’t have any, and definitely not the four we had been assured of. New shipments were going out and mistakes happen. She found the nearest one to us, another six miles away, that had three in stock. She asked if she needed to call and hold one for us, but I thought that surely if we drove straight there we would be fine and she didn’t need to be troubled with it.

Thanks to Google Maps I found the Target in a part of town I hadn’t been in, and we raced to the toy section, the Oldest so excited. This time, this time we were going to find it. He hummed the Star Wars theme even more enthusiastically, less of a hum, more of a DUUUUUUUUUUUUUNDUN DUHDUNDUHDUUUUUUNDUN at normal volume as we made our way through the aisles. I could see the disappointment in his face when we walked down the Lego aisle and there was no X-Wing.

I asked a Target employee if I could steal him for a moment, and after finding out that there were three in the store somewhere, they were refitting their toy section and the boxes and boxes of toys on carts at the end of each aisle told me that we weren’t going to find it. To his credit, the employee went through a few boxes, had a stack fall on him because I couldn’t catch them in time, and none of the ones he opened had Star Wars Legos. Bless all of the Target employees that politely helped me today, sans makeup and looking as exhausted as I felt with two kids in tow sporting faces that were a combination of excitedly anxious and let down.

The defeat was strong with this trip, but the Oldest shrugged and said he’d just not get anything today and would wait until we found one in stock after joking about going to seven more stores to make it an even ten. On the way home while the boys discussed who their favorite Doctor was (Ten is the general consensus), I couldn’t believe that I’d driven twenty miles away from the house just to find a Lego set. I never do that kind of thing. But his enthusiasm was infectious, and that is something I recognize. It wasn’t a whiny I want this so bad and I want it now! from a ten year old, but an I am so into this and it would be amazing if I could put this together and I’m willing to wait to get it kind of thing. And as they started weighing how much they missed Rose Tyler over Amy Pond and if they liked Nine or Twelve better, I realized that he hasn’t even seen the new Star Wars. He has Darth Vader everything, got the original trilogy for Christmas, and loves Star Wars probably more than anything else he’s ever gotten into, including Doctor Who, but I haven’t been able to take him to see the new movie.

If it doesn’t come back in stock soon, maybe we should get a theater gift card with his Target Gift Card and go to the movies.

Update:

Four days after this post was made, we receive a mysterious box in the mail.

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Huge thank you to @mercymegaming. You’re unbelievable.

Book Review: You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day

[A partial cross-post from my writing blog.]

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Everyone I know knows Felicia Day. We love her. She’s a treasure. She’s one of us. But when I heard she had written a book, I suddenly realized that other than things you could look up on IMDB and just loving her existence as a human, I didn’t have a clue about her. You may not meet many people in your day-to-day who know who Felicia Day is, yet in a very specific pocket of society, Felicia is not only well known, but very much loved.  Considering herself a “situational celebrity”, in her memoir You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost), Felicia tells the story of how she became such a popular figure in geek culture with equal parts humility and humor.

After lunch on the day after Christmas, while my husband marathon-played Lego Jurassic World on Xbox and my boys put together well over a thousand pieces of Legos on the dining room table (no exaggeration), I opened Felicia’s book. That night before bed I had already finished reading, feeling as if I had spent the day getting the kind of backstory usually only available once you reach Level Three friendship. Through adventures of her childhood experiencing multiple moves throughout the south due to her father being in the military while being homeschooled by her hands-off liberal mother, attending university on a scholarship as a violin prodigy without having a high school diploma (maintaining a 4.0, of course), and a gaming addiction that lead to the creation of her web series The Guild, Felicia proves to be one of the most fascinating and relatable people you could have the pleasure of meeting via words on a page. Open about her struggles with severe anxiety and panic attacks, moments of star struck embarrassment, and her experience with “Gamer Gate”, You’re Never Weird is more than a humorous memoir. It’s also more than a New York Times Bestseller. Even better, Felicia leaves you with the attitude that with hard work and maybe a few breakdowns, you could take over the world – even if it’s just a specific pocket of one.

Under Construction: Upcoming projects

First posts are difficult, so I’m going to keep this one short.

I’m working on creating content for this page. In the future, I’ll be posting a variety of pop and geek culture elements, including a convention review, show and movie reviews, commentary on fan fiction, and fandom as a fan outlet. I’m excited to write about experiences, and I won’t shy away from the bad while raving about the good.

Click follow. I promise I’ll be worth it.