Film

Logan is the Superhero Movie We’ve All Been Waiting For

We’ve suffered through a few rough installments of the X-Men series, and frankly, we’ve been suffering through a lot of superhero movies that blatantly ripped apart character development or spat in the face of canon all for the sake of the Big Audience. Blockbuster movies have been a staple of the superhero/sci-fi/fantasy genre for decades, and for many viewers, the predictable plot lines, deaths for shock value, and poor application of special effects, editing, or cinematography have made the movie-going experience a little stale. But we’ll go because we love the genre, and the production houses know it.

Last year, Fox Studios was backed into a corner when it released Deadpool, a rated R superhero (antihero) movie that featured sex, cursing, and more bloody murders than any red suit could conceal. It was a hilarious punch in the face to movie execs who swore that the superhero movie’s target audience was the PG-13 crowd, and it couldn’t be a success if there wasn’t the opportunity to market the movie to the whole family and pump out some serious merchandise for kiddos to gobble up.

What Deadpool did for the genre in terms of shaking things up, Logan has taken a step further by doing the unexpected. Going a step in another direction, Michael Green, David James Kelly, and James Mangold present a grim character-driven film that does what X-Men has always (or should have) done – presented the audience with interesting characters, a social commentary that is culturally relevant, and questions that stay with them when the lights go up.

Logan is a lightly-played prophetic dystopia of what feels like a very realistic future. It drives into the heart of society, of Logan and Charles Xavier, and of our own humanity while posing questions about personal autonomy. Mangold’s story has depth without exposition, and paired with John Mathieson’s eye for shooting compelling scenes, Logan is a beautiful film – something that most superhero movies can’t claim. There’s action, explosions, and all the other traditional action fodder that audiences eat up, but it’s done in a way that is compelling. There were moments while watching I was captivated by stunts and choreography that I hadn’t seen before. And even better, Logan doesn’t guarantee anyone’s safety; there’s no sense of the hero shall prevail. Instead, the audience is in the moment, not sure whether or not anyone will make it to the next day. There’s no nightmare to wake up from, and everything will not be okay.

Beyond the outstanding visuals and somber story, the acting of Sir Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, and Dafne Keene (who we should all most certainly watch) was superb. Perhaps there was more body to the script than previous movies, but Logan simply stands out from the performances of previous installments. The supporting cast, including Orange is the New Black‘s Elizabeth Rodriguez, Boyd Holbrook, Stephen Merchant, and Eriq La Salle, is excellent as well, seamlessly adding to the dynamic of the narrative.

At this point, I don’t have any criticisms of the film – the questions left unanswered aren’t truly relevant to appreciating the story we were given. There was drama, humor, action, and meta-references that actually prove to aid the story and aren’t a standalone prop for fans to point and smile at. To top off the already deep satisfaction of the film’s ending, Johnny Cash’s “The Man Comes Around” plays us off in a fitting tribute to the title character.  Hopefully the success of this film leads to more R-rated, character driven flicks that do these characters and their stories justice. These movies don’t have to be guys and gals in spandex who never curse; take these characters and ground them in reality and you still have an extremely compelling story to tell, both through narrative and visually.

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Mad Max, Fury Road

Mad Max: Fury Road kills the Oscars

While the Oscars predilection for genre films, let alone science fiction, has been non-existent, last night George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road performed exceptionally well. One of two sci-fi film nominees for Best Picture, Fury Road (alongside The Martian) joins only a handful of films of this genre to have been recognized by the Academy. The film didn’t win the arguably deserved Best Picture despite a worldwide box office of over $370 million, but it did take home awards for Sound Mixing, Sound Editing, Film Editing, Production Design, Makeup, and Costume Design – more awards than any other film nominated this year.

But why was its nomination for Best Picture so important? Take a look at the cast and the so-called controversy surrounding the film. As soon as the film was described as a feminist, the backlash began. Max doesn’t speak much during the film, but that makes his presence and actions even more pronounced, and Tom Hardy‘s performance was outstanding. The women featured prominently in the film include an amputee as well as actresses from different nationalities/racial backgrounds and various ages. Charlize Theron commands respect brings the importance of the overall plot to the audience through her character, Imperator Furiosa. The women at the center of the film (portrayed by Zoë KravitzRosie Huntington-WhiteleyRiley KeoughAbbey Lee, and Courtney Eatonare sex slaves escaping the Citadel and the nightmare of Immortan Joe (Mad Max alum Hugh Keays-Byrne). The War Boys that work alongside Furiosa trust her in a way that regards her position with a tremendous trust prior to her betrayal that isn’t overtly obvious to the audience – and that’s the point.

In the end, the arguments of why the film isn’t feminist are unsurprisingly reasons why the film is feminist. The chastity belts the women have locked around them are toothed, threatening to put any potential rapist in peril – but these were placed by a man who wanted to save the raping privileges for himself. The women are owned, kept captive, raped, and called “breeders”, and this denotation is purposeful in the storytelling as the mantra of the movie is We Are Not Things. The weak arguments of a feminist story being shoved down the throats of the Mad Max franchise’s fans doesn’t hold up, and the efforts Miller made in creating a story that was compelling and included female narratives was deserving of the Best Picture nomination – not because there were women, but because it was a great film. The movies, while centered around Max, have always been about the people he interacts with more so than him specifically, and the continuity of specific moments over the course of the films such as Max trying to retrieve his belongings (jacket, boot, his iconic V8 Interceptor) and the fallible shotgun shells and weapons jams were perfection. The War Boys and their worshiping the V8 was a great addition, and Nicholas Hoult‘s Nux was an interesting and wonderful character for the Mad Max universe. The story, visuals, editing, choreography, special and physical effects, and the sound were all outstanding, and the Academy served the film well with the nominations and awards it received. If only it could have received the award it deserved – Best Picture.