Meredith Glynn

Supernatural Writers Glynn and Berens Tee Up the End of Season 12 With “The Future”

Last night’s episode of Supernatural was extraordinary in so many ways – enough for me to want to sit down and write something about it. We’re in season 12 with the Winchesters, and with the show renewed for an unprecedented 13th season on the CW, fans are curious as to how these story lines and relationships between the characters are going to play out. Spoilers below!

With episode “The Future” (12.19), writers Meredith Glynn and Robert Berens breathed some life into a season that has felt a bit disjointed both in writing and, in some cases, acting. Shows have a tendency to drop plot points and pick them up later when convenient, and Supernatural is not immune to this. After last season’s questionable plot regarding the Darkness and the short-lived and ill-used arc of Dean Winchester as a demon in season 10, some viewers are in and out, cherry-picking the episodes they watch live (during initial airing) based on the writers and what characters are involved. The show has been around long enough for fans to know which episodes are must-watch and which ones can sit on the DVR for a few days. Whether or not the show takes note, a lot of this has to do with who penned the script.

“The Future” brought back the angel Castiel (Misha Collins) who had been incommunicado, and returned to the main plot of the season. A woman pregnant with the antichrist (Kelly Kline, played by Courtney Ford) is being fought over by heaven and hell and Sam and Dean Winchester (played by Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles) struggle to find a way to save as many lives as possible while putting down the threat of Lucifer’s child being born, while Cas decides to take the fight on himself for the Winchester’s safety and to redeem himself for heaven.  This all feels a little bit like Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens in terms of possibility for plot direction, and if it did happen to go that way, I for one would not be upset about it. 

This week’s writers scripted the characters in such a natural way that I actually fell back in love with the show. Glynn and Berens didn’t overcrowd the script by pushing way too many characters and plot points into an episode, nor did they make excuses for where they might be in a way that distracts from the story they’re trying to tell on screen at that moment. Other episodes have tried to patch plot holes with shoddily presented exposition, and “The Future” didn’t try to do that. With the exception of one moment regarding the pregnancy term with a nephilim that I don’t think could have been helped with as far along in the season we are, there wasn’t a ton of exposition just thrown out flat, and even at that Jared Padalecki’s delivery allowed it to flow like conversation.

In addition to the dialog that felt very natural, the small things Glynn and Berens put into the script truly allowed the audience to suspend disbelief in a show that was beginning to feel like a soap opera. Cas trying to return a cassette tape Dean had given him. Sam is hard at work calculating and plotting their next move. Cas is locked out of the Impala, and even though he’s arguing with Sam about what to do and defending why he’s mad at Cas, Dean still tosses Cas the keys and continues his conversation. That’s real. That’s layering a scene. This writing team proved it doesn’t have to be all close ups and dramatic pauses. A scene doesn’t have to stop for emotion to be pouring from the characters while also moving the plot along.

Any actor will tell you that a well-written script makes their job easier, and it really showed last night. The cast’s mannerisms as their characters were less exaggerated than some of the season’s previous episodes. In those cases I alluded to above, the characters are sometimes written and therefore played in ways that feel like caricatures of who they have been portrayed as for years. Lucifer’s power and fierceness as he screamed at the demon Dagon (played beautifully by Ali Ahn) came through without coming off cartoonish which matched the tone of the episode, and the timing of everything, whether comedic or dramatic, was perfect. Collin’s portrayal of Cas essentially being kidnapped and talking to Kelly from the backseat of the Impala was outstanding. Padalecki expresses Sam’s earnestness and hope to perfection, and the hurt Dean feels is played even more poignantly in this episode – almost unlike anything we’ve seen since season 8, but Ackles’ facial expressions and tone of voice are always on point.

Amanda Tapping (who also played angel Naomi in Season 8) directed the episode, continuing an enjoyable trend of Supernatural alum directing episodes. The potentially triggering suicide attempt at the beginning of the episode could have been played far worse than it was, but in the hands of Tapping, it was presented it in a way that was actually beautiful and used as an integral piece of storytelling – not showing the skin being pierced, but instead focusing on the face of the actress to draw full attention to the emotions the character was going through. For a graphic suicide scene, it was, in my opinion, tastefully done. The framing of scenes was beautiful, especially when peeking through the art deco cutouts in the Men of Letters bunker and wall partition in the motel room. While a few things stuck out in an I wish they had… kind of way, the episode was one of the best of the season, hands down. [Note: Next week we’ll have an episode directed by another person who’s no stranger to the Supernatural family, Richard Speight, Jr., and written by new arrival Steve Yockey, both fan favorites.]

As usual, there were some dissenters online (especially on twitter) who expressed hatred of the episode because, frankly, they simply don’t like one of the main characters, no matter what the writers do. Their negativity is in no way a commentary on Glynn and Berens’ abilities. The arguments ranged from asking why Cas was still alive to why he would leave the Winchesters in danger, but when played against every character arc in the show’s history, especially in regards to the recurring theme of doing the wrong thing for the right reasons, their arguments are hollow. Glynn and Berens wrote a story that was completely in line with the overarching themes of the show and the motivations of its characters and seemed to foreshadow a frightening and compelling end to the season – something the audience needs after the past two years’ season finales fell a little flat. Whether audience members liked the episode or not, everyone is wondering if Cas is being influenced by the unborn nephilim that saved him from Dagon, and how this potential pull on loyalties will turn out for Cas, Sam, and Dean. This is one of few times during season 12 that I can say I’m genuinely looking forward to finding out what happens next for the Winchesters. 

Supernatural airs Thursdays on the CW at 8pm EST, 7pm Central.